Mariamz

Posts Tagged ‘Social Media

Just noticed this new detail on a Linkedin profile I was checking out – it’s part of Linkedin’s new style layouts. I really like the way it visualises how you are connected to others: as you roll over the little circles (g+ inspired?) you can see all of the companies associated with a person, and those you share in common.

You can also select network types from the drop-down menu: industry, school and location, e.g.:

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This appeared in a Daily Mail piece yesterday in relation to Sally Bercow’s latest mis-tweet. (Bercow – whose Twitter account has now been sucked down the memory hole – had identified an under-aged person in a tweet that a UK court order had banned from being named.)

I’d just like to focus in on the unnamed ‘legal experts’ here stating that using Twitter constitutes publication. In my view it is rather odd and irresponsible for Sally to have named the person in the way she did (and if this was knowingly done, is clearly in ‘contempt of court’). But overall, I maintain we need different rules for sharing and discussing on social media.

On social media, individuals should be treated as citizens, with special protections for their freedom of speech and right to share, until they write or speak with the authority of a collective, institutional platform.

First of all, because restrictions on public civic discourse are generally harmful and counter-productive, and secondly, because collective media institutions have a special legal status (and usually access to far superior legal counsel) which means they can be pursued by authorities (and wronged individuals like Lord McAlpine) as institutional collectives.

Without separate rules for individuals on social media, people will frequently foul of the law at great expense just for airing their views or unwittingly sharing problematic items they have come across in public environments or from bigger media. Or fall silent – and we surely don’t want that..

This web design detail on Dezeen encourages and champions online engagement neatly – highlighting ‘reader* comments’ prominently alongside editor picks.

*I wonder how long publishers will keep calling active online participants ‘readers’ for.. always seems too passive 

It can be really rather hard to train (or explain to) people who don’t use a social platform every day – what, why and when to share what others say, and especially when and why it is prudent or funny to pass on criticism from others, especially implied criticism that is laden with intended or unintended thought-provoking nuances.

http://twitter.com/QueenofBiscuits/status/265932216348057600

Having recently co-hosted a workshop laying out the differences between effective Facebook and Twitter engagement, I thought this example just retweeted by Mumsnet illustrates the Twitter trainer’s challenge beautifully…

p.s. posting via mobile, pls excuse any formatting issues

within five years social media will be the number two way to engage with customers (after face-to-face personal interaction). That’s a step in the right direction, but why wait five years? The internet will have changed all over again by then, and business is in danger of being left behind.

Richard Branson, via Global IBM CEO Study

Last weekend I took part in a Cambridge Festival of Ideas panel discussion on whether we are being ‘sold online’ alongside Michal Kosinski of Cambridge University, Professor Bill Dutton of the Oxford Internet Institute and Nick Pickles of Big Brother Watch.

During this I proposed that practitioners who deal with collecting, processing, analysing and sharing social media data can operate according to a simple principle, to weight privacy in favour of individuals, and transparency towards institutions. For indeed, such responsible data dealing is essential for attaining and retaining trust in 21st century institutions…


Delving further into what this means in practice I put forward the following framework, which can be used by marketers to clearly document and ask questions of social data usage:

Best Practice Data Dealers Recipe Card

Note: my recipe card is loosely based on Tony Benn’s five questions to power

You’ve done your research, you know what your audience like to read, watch, say online. You’re ready to take your brand presence to the next level online, you want to make it big on Facebook… to post, to listen, to learn, to really reach and engage with people. Trouble is, your prime prospects don’t want to talk about <insert products> all day long. They don’t want to muse on what colour theirs is, or what they did with it last week. They might think <insert products> are great… but they have no desire to go on about it, in any way, not even on your shiny, carefully constructed Facebook page.

So what’s needed is content your target people will talk about, and share.. that’s funny, or otherwise entertaining.. and whatever it is, ideally it needs to lead in some logical way back to your product. Even better, a rich content seam you can mine again and again. Sure it can be about ‘lifestyle’ – but if the product can be found in the message.. that’s when it’s working hardest.

Red Bull Wings Facebook post

A good example of this principle in action is Red Bull’s Facebook page posts – referring to ‘wings.’ The brand has cultivated a life on the edge image.. but importantly, for the day to day on Facebook, it references wings.. in all kinds of obscure ways, making its audience think back to the brand.. and the high octane fizzy concoctions it ultimately wants to sell.

‘Wings’ then, is a simple, effective ‘social object‘ that gives the brand lots of room to play. Which is what’s needed for inspiration when you are trying to engage one of the toughest, least patient, audiences online: young men.


This blog is about utilizing and optimizing the social web for business, pleasure and social change

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