Mariamz

Posts Tagged ‘crowdsourcing

Love the way Unilever are integrating sustainability communications into their Facebook page here – which currently has a healthy 697,000 likes. Within the dedicated ‘sustainable living’ tab on its app the brand asks people what they do and don’t want to hear about from its three sustainability pillars.

The thumbs down sign is almost, but not quite, a forbidden ‘dislike’ button. But in any case negative responses are not displayed – it seems only total thumbs ups are shown.

Participation numbers aren’t high – but that’s probably because it’s buried half way down a secondary tab on its main brands app (and not sure how long it’s been there). They also might want to consider integrating voting with some sort of incentive, e.g. a charity donation – like Petplan UK are doing at the moment on their Facebook app:

Disclosure: Petplan UK are a client

Pinterest has officially been the fastest growing social network this year. But why do we love it so? Why is it driving sales so much better than other social networks? Why is it so moreish?

Pinterest traffic growth to March 2012

I’m running a private Pinterest training session next week, where I’ll be covering:

  • A rapid introduction to the hottest visual social network right now
  • Overview of best in class activity
  • Activation framework

And I thought it would work well, especially for those in the room not already into it, to start off explaining why people love Pinterest… how they feel about it… to bring it to life. Personally, I’d muse the following:

  • We’re tired of looking at words on screens. I was talking to an old friend the other day who was at college when computers first hit the market. She said they used to tell them not to read on screen. To this day she usually prints everything – she says everyone has got too obsessed with saving trees (which can be replaced) – but your eyesight can’t. Whatever you think about this logic.. I think one of the reasons we love Pinterest is our eyes have become wary of reading reams and reams of information, and you can actually see a whole world of ideas on Pinterest (especially when you browse the ‘everything’ tab – without reading a word.
  • Simple serendipity. Eli Pariser, among other doom-sayers, have waxed lyrical at length about the danger of filter-bubbles in how we use the web as individuals. Our use of Twitter is mostly confined to the people we follow, the lists we have chosen to follow, searching for – or following the hashtags we are already interested in. On Facebook we see the pages and people we already like or know. But on Pinterest the ‘Everything’ tab is an easy, visual view into the world of many, many, others. It’s easy to skim past any picture you find offensive (and actually its Acceptable Use Policy and usage norms mean I very rarely see anything that fits that category from my perspective).
  • The whole world meets one click product discovery. When we shop online we usually go to a very few trusted websites, for the brands and websites we know. Or use massive shopping aggregators like asos which enable us to scroll through pages and pages of bags and shoes. But it can be samey. We get tired of looking at 300 dresses just to find one we like. We get ourselves into the mood to shop but somehow the pressure of scrolling and searching takes the shine off. You can’t touch or see the items up close and you get a bit fed up after watching 20 little videos to work out how the fabric hangs. But on Pinterest a dress or pair of shoes, new make-up or hair idea is all mixed up with cool travel and home and even digital inspiration. It’s not just one shop or even a virtual high street… it’s pictures of the whole world online.. it’s the beach, the bar, the library, the philosopher and the boutique all at once.

That’s just some speculation from me… but why do other Pinners love it? I thought I’d use the ethnographic method of observing what people say about their feelings about it on Twitter:

In keeping with ethnographic research principles – I started with a question, gave my feelings on the platform and the perspective from which I am approaching the question, and uncovered themes from my observations.. represented here in this word cloud:

Here are those themes in more detail:

  • It helps you easily share what you find and love.. without having to comment on it in any great detail – e.g. Danni Minogue’s pets board has shown me with pictures, some insight into her personality I’d never have really gauged otherwise
  • I’ve heard people say this in person too – it takes you into another world – a more dream-like world
  • It drives desire
  • It inspires you to make new things (or makes you feel you should be!)
  • It gives you hints, tips and recipes that can brighten your day
  • Music was a new one on me – how does one use it for that I wonder? Via video perhaps? This is how I discovered you can now pin sounds from Soundcloud onto Pinterest
  • The quotes help you feel positive (personally I always feel an undercurrent of embarrassment when I re-tweet inspirational quotes on Twitter but it just doesn’t feel like that on Pinterest)
  • It makes you feel good by letting you know when other people like what you love
  • I’ve often found it annoying that I can’t pin directly from G+ or Facebook – but the fact someone suggested it as a reason to love Pinterest made me think… it’s a good safeguard against it getting filled up with lots of personal pictures of people falling out of nightclubs and indeed outfits
  • It can lift your mood – or help you explore the mood you’re in
  • The ease which which you can share visually makes it less intimidating for non-technical users as a collaboration / bookmarking tool
  • Photos are usually professionally taken / shared when they fit with the professionally taken shots there – meaning their visually stunning appeal differs from the more amateur photography you might expect on Flickr, or personal (to you) shots you see on Facebook
  • It can help creative people to think visually

So that was fun… a view into the world of our positive feelings towards Pinterest. But I must report that in the course of this research I found a significant number of people reporting negative feelings – i.e. the wish their lives were as fabulous as the world they can enter on Pinterest / their Pinterest boards. This reminded me of criticisms levelled at magazines over the years – on how they make people feel in terms of pressures on how to be and what to buy.

Back on the sunnier flip side, something I realised in trawling tweets about why people have taken to Pinterest so readily – is how much they love to say how much they love eachother’s pins. We might posit here that if Facebook be the platform of like, Pinterest be that of love

Wikipedia is a global phenomenon; the openly-editable encyclopedia is the sixth most popular site in the world. So it’s not surprising that, every now and again, vested interests seek to manipulate its content. Not least in the American presidential race, where, for example, Mitt Romney’s Wikipedia page has been edited hundreds of times since the Republican primaries began.

Wikipedia’s community guidelines are all available on line and easy to find, but still, sometimes the best of us in the communications industry, or perhaps our colleagues, clients or friends… wonder whether it is a good idea to change an entry in their favour. In such cases, the following points (adapted from Wikipedia’s guidelines) should be followed, to avoid wasting your time creating / editing changes that are undone, or worse, cause severe embarrassment or legal consequences:

  1. All of your edits should be in line with the aim of Wikipedia, which is to produce a neutralreliably sourced encyclopedia
  2. Wikipedia is not a battleground – you should not try to begin or engage in disputes via Wikipedia entries
  3. Avoid Conflict of Interest (COI) editing. This involves contributing to Wikipedia in order to promote your own interests or those of other individuals, companies, or groups. Where advancing outside interests is more important to an editor than advancing the aims of Wikipedia, that editor stands in a conflict of interest
  4. This includes avoiding self-promotion: including advertising links, personal website links, personal or semi-personal photos, or other material that appears to promote the private or commercial interests of the editor, or their associates. Examples of these types of material include:
    1. Links that appear to promote products by pointing to obscure or not particularly relevant commercial sites (commercial links).
    2. Links that appear to promote otherwise obscure individuals by pointing to their personal pages.
    3. Biographical material that does not significantly add to the clarity or quality of the article.
    4. Promotional article production on behalf of clients Editors should not create articles which serve solely to promote their subject. All Wikipedia articles should contain useful information written as if from a neutral point of view. The writing of “puff pieces” and advertisements on Wikipedia is strictly prohibited. If you contribute to Wikipedia on behalf of clients, you owe it to both them and the encyclopedia to make very sure you understand the standards for content here, and do not insert promotional material.
  5. Wikipedia is not a soapbox or means of promotion or advertising. All information about companies and products are written in an objective and unbiased style. All article topics must be verifiable with independentthird-party sources, so articles about very small “garage” or local companies are typically unacceptable. See also Wikipedia:Notability (organizations and companies) for guidelines on corporate notability.
  6. Those promoting causes or events, or issuing public service announcements, even if noncommercial, should use a forum other than Wikipedia to do so.

If you are in a situation where you need or wish to try and adapt a Wikipedia page on behalf of an individual or institution on the grounds of accuracy, explain your case on the Wikipedia talk page that sits behind it – being transparent about how you would like the page to be edited and why, and including reference links.

Today Kit Kat UK ends its grand social campaign to choose who will be the next ‘Chunky Champion’ (voting ends midnight tonight).

This truly integrated communications piece, where the brand released four limited edition chocolate bars of different flavours and asked the public to vote on which will remain in the nation’s sweet shops, demonstrates how a social media campaign can work across multiple platforms in harmony.

It also speaks to the promise of social media enabling even massive corporations to bring people into their product decision-making processes.

Facebook voting

The Kit Kat UK Facebook page has enabled voters to select from four choices for the Kit Kat chunky bar. With well-positioned use of a ‘like-gate’ (you can move around the page but not vote until you ‘like’) page visitors are enticed in to make their selection.

After the necessary ‘like’ you are presented with a clear and compelling voting page…

But the mechanics are a little clunky after this point – after getting to the voting app you need to click again to confirm your vote or enter your details for the competition. This seems a little unnecessary – personally I would have designed it for votes be submitted first and offer the competition option to users afterwards, but it’s a fairly minor detail.

Of more annoyance is the way Facebook’s news privacy controls work -after hitting vote you get its weird app halfway house… the social media equivalent of the Beetlejuice waiting room.

 

And on the app screen while it is good that you can restrict who sees this activity to certain lists of friends, you cannot select more than one list (maybe they need a visit from a friendly G+ engineer on this one).

Word of Mouth

From personal experience the Word of Mouth on this has been truly buzzing… I’ve heard several complaints that you ‘can’t get hold of a peanut one anywhere’. This meme also spills onto KitKat’s Facebook wall – where it might be considered whether this ‘shortage’ is actually rather convenient PR for the campaign…

Interestingly I have mostly seen women on social media talking about wanting the white chocolate version (currently in second place) – whereas the campaign is aimed at young men – and the peanut butter version has been the clear winner throughout.

If more women are saying they want white (we know they generally communicate more on social networks like Facebook than men do) – but peanut butter is still winning – perhaps this means Kit Kat have indeed hit a sweet spot by appealing to rafts of men who will hit the vote button but not necessarily engage in conversation about it. (The campaign was designed to reach a male audience).

TV and radio

Radio ads have sent people to the Facebook page to vote – specifying that participants must be over 18. Even more compelling has been the strategic tie up with ITV – which has enabled ads showing live voting updates to be screened on prime TV ad slots.

YouTube

For YouTube KitKat recruited four well known actors from the cutting edge of comedy to support the campaign with webisodes where each campaigns for their flavour:

  • KIT KAT Chunky Orange supported by Miles Jupp, known for his role in In The Thick Of It, and his appearances on panel shows Mock The Week and Have I Got News For You, offers the addition of a zingy orange flavour
  • KIT KAT Chunky White Choc supported by Tony Gardner, known for his roles in The Thick Of It and Lead Balloon, sees the famous Kit Kat wafer encased in luxurious white chocolate
  • KIT KAT Chunky Double Choc, supported by Miranda Hennessy, known for her role in Channel 4’s Phone Shop, adds an extra layer of milk chocolate to make for an indulgent chocolatey taste
  • KIT KAT Chunky Peanut Butter supported by Jason Lewis, star of his own MTV show The Jason Lewis Experience, sees the return of a popular past variant with its own distinct flavour combination and new recipe

The Results

Anecdote aside there are early signs that the campaign has reaped dividends on Facebook. In addition to obvious engagement on the UK Facebook wall they have seen massive growth in likes since the campaign began – they have been one of the top growing pages in the last month on Facebook:

Source: Social Bakers

“We could learn a lot from the music industry, and the rather terrible ways the music industry has tried to combat piracy”…. Rovio sees it as “futile” to pursue pirates through the courts, except in cases where it feels the products they are selling are harmful to the Angry Birds brand, or ripping off its fans. When that’s not the case, Rovio sees it as a way to attract more fans, even if it is not making money from the products. “Piracy may not be a bad thing: it can get us more business at the end of the day.”

Mikael Hed via  Stuart Dredge

It is definitely a balancing act but for us it’s all about helping people to have quality discussions, whether people want to use a pseudonym or not. It seems as though most people currently associate a commenter using their real name as one who produces a higher quality comment. We’re looking to let everyone know, by our data, that’s incorrect

Talton Figgins, Disqus


This weekend the nation (or at least those watching [UK] ITV1 at 7.55pm on Sunday 15 January) will see who online users have chosen as their favourite new TV advert for reed.co.uk.

People have been deciding over the past month between six shortlisted ads, all created by up-and-coming UK filmmakers.

The winning filmmaker will also receive a £10,000 cash prize and have the opportunity to work on future reed.co.uk projects with celebrated commercials and film director, Paul Weiland, whose team was behind the original ‘Love Mondays’ radio and outdoor campaign.

onrec

The campaign shows how voting on humorous crowd-sourced content, on a subject to which people can relate, can make for gratifying, low barrier-to-entry online participation. The bouncy design on the page bringing it all together works very well too.

Beyond the basic vote, online users can also connect and engage with the budding film directors through social media. Nick Bennett, creative director of Steel (the agency behind the campaign), said “It’s not just advertising. It’s social entertainment.”

Personally I’m rooting for Super Reed:


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