Mariamz

Posts Tagged ‘content

It is estimated 67% of online searchers are driven to search by an offline channel. Connecting the offline, to the online, and back again, is exactly what Rijksmuseum did here – creating a fantastically shareable video and image, driving immediate and sustained buzz and massive queues at the opening these theatrical types were promoting..

Hat tip: Clairey Ross

Mark Ritson recently wrote, If you think Oreo won the advertising Super Bowl with a tweet, look at the social media scoreboardIn this, he puts forward a bold position: firstly that social media reaches a relatively small number of people, in a relatively light way (in comparison to TV ads) and secondly, that “The players might have changed, but the game has always been the same.” I’d like to briefly tackle these sentiments with some counter-points:

  1. Two-way, multi-way, a new way:  It’s a standard social media point to make, but it’s seems it still must be. The game is not the same, because we are talking about many to many communication, about instantaneous interaction between publics and brands. Broadcast media (print, tv and to a great extent radio) was about crafting messages and pushing them out. Social media is about stakeholders, customers, innovators, product developers, consumers, suppliers, shareholders, customer services getting under eachother’s skin in real-time. It means a wealth of chances to make better products, services, institutions and outcomes, and for a brand to know, in no uncertain terms, whether it is delighting, inspiring, boring, horrifying, losing or poisoning its target customers and (former) audiences faster than ever, ever before.
  2. Broadcast reach vs reach on the brand’s terms: According to Ritson’s calculations, the Oreo tweet reached 200,000 people, which he compares with the 8 million Americans who eat an Oreos cookie during one year. But these sums ignore that social media engagement does not rest on one tweet alone, however brilliantly improvised its content. If an individual likes a brand enough to follow it, to endure its posts, by choice, day in day out - that brand has a chance of reaching that number of people, with what it chooses, on its own terms, and over and over again. It does not have to pay per placement, negotiate partnerships with publishers or pitch to journalists. It decides what to say and how to say it, and gets it out there immediately. And what happens on Twitter doesn’t stay on Twitter.  According to Exact Target, discussions that begin on Twitter are more likely to appear elsewhere on the web than they are from any other network.
  3. Tiny stories versus big bangs: Ritson challenges the value of Oreo’s tweet on the grounds of its ‘potency’, because he is apparently wedded to the old-school marketing obsession with the big bang, a million eyeballs, that golden moment where a message reaches every heart, and the earth moves for everyone simultaneously. But in the new social media environment, we ridicule and mock big campaigns when they don’t make sense to us – and our voices are so loud brands can’t help but hear. Conversely, we cheer those that listen, move collaboratively, give us choices and help us make our mark. As Marcus Brown recently wrote marketers / social business people need to “watch and listen to all of the tiny noises, the personal moments, the little disasters and the massive moments of personal joy that surround us daily. We should be improvising with the tiny stories.”
  4. We likee, we buyee, and there’s no excuse for metrical ignorance: There are various studies showing correlation between liking and following brands, and propensity to recommend, purchase, and purchase more from them. (And stats showing that poor social media engagement impacts bottom lines.) That given, there is still no need for any marketer to settle for anecdotal or macro-data: from Facebook insights to Google goal setting, tracking the effectiveness of digital communications through the customer and stakeholder funnel, brand by brand, product by product, is a matter of effort and skill, not luck or magic. There is simply no need, with the wealth of metrics at our fingertips, to be asking rhetorically the value of social media activation versus broadcast placements.

On and offline – when there is a surprise, welcome or not, how you respond makes all the difference. For brands and institutions, this can take you down interesting, unexpected and lucrative paths.

Nude Men Leopold Museum

Like Oreos, who achieved 13,734 re-tweets for its Superbowl suggestion to ‘Dunk in the dark‘ after the lights went out. And the Leopold Museum, who has responded to an man stripping off at its exhibition by offering nude viewings of its ‘Nude Men’ collection.

You’ve done your research, you know what your audience like to read, watch, say online. You’re ready to take your brand presence to the next level online, you want to make it big on Facebook… to post, to listen, to learn, to really reach and engage with people. Trouble is, your prime prospects don’t want to talk about <insert products> all day long. They don’t want to muse on what colour theirs is, or what they did with it last week. They might think <insert products> are great… but they have no desire to go on about it, in any way, not even on your shiny, carefully constructed Facebook page.

So what’s needed is content your target people will talk about, and share.. that’s funny, or otherwise entertaining.. and whatever it is, ideally it needs to lead in some logical way back to your product. Even better, a rich content seam you can mine again and again. Sure it can be about ‘lifestyle’ – but if the product can be found in the message.. that’s when it’s working hardest.

Red Bull Wings Facebook post

A good example of this principle in action is Red Bull’s Facebook page posts – referring to ‘wings.’ The brand has cultivated a life on the edge image.. but importantly, for the day to day on Facebook, it references wings.. in all kinds of obscure ways, making its audience think back to the brand.. and the high octane fizzy concoctions it ultimately wants to sell.

‘Wings’ then, is a simple, effective ‘social object‘ that gives the brand lots of room to play. Which is what’s needed for inspiration when you are trying to engage one of the toughest, least patient, audiences online: young men.

The toughest thing for the probabilistic magazine brand is to find some kind of coherence. In the traditional sense, coherence as a package of interrelated content is gone. The story is the unit that matters, after all. But a big part of the value we add *is* structuring the world in a consistent way. So, the question becomes: what can form the basis for a new coherence for magazines?

One answer that is specific to The Atlantic but extensible is very old: moral purpose. This magazine was founded as an abolitionist publication and that helped structure the varied voices that ran in its pages through the early days.

Alexis Madrigal  

Social Local Mobile curation, where content and places are shared with a simple click, and value perception is added (often condensed in a line that is most probably shorter than 140 characters ), will drive a lot of the social web in 2012

Danny Devriendt

Disclosure: Danny is a colleague of mine at Porter Novelli


This blog is about utilizing and optimizing the social web for business, pleasure and social change

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